Racism: What’s happening? Where to from here?(Mar21)

ROUNDTABLE ON RACISM
WHAT IS GOING ON? WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

(REPORT to be posted shortly)

Watch a series of short videos from the roundtable on the Pearson Centre’s Facebook page: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbceGf4FA5NxXuYv0qNwsow

Tuesday, March 21, 8:00-11:00 am
Canadian Museum of History (Douglas Cardinal Room), Gatineau

This Roundtable began to identify the following broad issues:
– Where racism and hate is prevalent or growing.
– Steps for governments and non-government players to take towards the elimination of racism and hate.
– Ways in which Canadians can engage in dialogue that will advance understanding of each other, eliminate prejudice and combat racism.

Schedule:
8:00 am Registration, Networking
8:30–10:30 am Roundtable discussion
10:30–11:00 am Networking

SPONSORS: CANADIAN MUSEUM OF HISOTRY; UNIFOR

PROGRAM

Welcome: Mark O’Neill, President & CEO, Canadian Museum of History
Opening: Arif Virani, MP,
Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage (Multiculturalism)

Lead-Off Speakers

Amira Elghawaby, Communications Director, National Council of Canadian Muslims
Farhia Ahmed, Justice for Abdirahman Coalition, Ottawa
Jacquie Lawrence, ‎Diversity & Equity Coordinator, Ottawa Carleton District School Board
Dara Wawatie-Chabot, Student
Dr. Karen Mock, President, JSpace Canada; Former Exec. Dir., Canadian Race Relations Foundation; and Human Rights League of B’Nai Brith

Chair:
Andrew Cardozo, President, Pearson Centre

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Table ronde sur le racisme
Que se passe-t-il ?
Où allons-nous ?

Mardi 21 mars – de 8h à 11h
Musée canadien de l’histoire (salle Douglas Cardinal), Gatineau

Comment cerner les grands thèmes suivants :
– Là où le racisme et la haine sont courants et se répandent.
– Démarches que les gouvernements et intervenants non-gouvernementaux peuvent prendre pour éliminer le racisme et la haine.
– Moyens à la disposition des Canadiens et Canadiennes pour lancer le dialogue et promouvoir la compréhension de l’autre, éliminer les préjudices et combattre le racisme.

Horaire :
8 h Inscriptions, prise de contact et petit-déjeuner continental
8 h 30 – 10 h 30 Table ronde
10 h 30 – 11h Réseautage

PROGRAMME

Mots de bienvenue : Mark O’Neill, président-directeur général, Musée canadien de l’histoire
Allocution d’ouverture : Arif Virani,
député, secrétaire parlementaire de la
ministre du Patrimoine canadien
(Multiculturalisme)

Conférenciers et conférencières

Amira Elghawaby, directrice des communications, Conseil national des musulmans canadiens
Farhia Ahmed, Justice for Abdirahman Coalition, Ottawa
Jacquie Lawrence, ‎coordonnatrice, Diversité & Équité, Conseil scolaire du district d’Ottawa Carleton
Dara Wawatie-Chabot, étudiante
Karen Mock, président, JSpace Canada; ancien dir. adm. de la Fondation canadienne des relations raciales, et Ligue des droits de la personne — B’Nai Brith

Président :
Andrew Cardozo, président, Centre Pearson

SPONSORS: CANADIAN MUSEUM OF HISOTRY; UNIFOR

Thank you to / Merci à
Bernard Eskénazi Translation/Traduction
& West Block Public Affairs

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Notes for Opening comments Andrew Cardozo

Thank you for joining us for the roundtable.
Bienvenu a notre Table Ronde sur le racisme. Que’est qui space dans le domaine du racism? Est ou allons nous?
As I noted in the invitation, we live an interesting conundrum. On the one hand Canada is one of the most diverse and harmonious countries in the world and are the envy of many nations. As we look around the world, we are somewhat of an island of sanity and stability.

On the other hand, we have had some serious racism throughout our history, starting with colonialism. We have certainly seen the presence of racism through our history, sometimes in society and sometimes from our governments. But I would like to think that since the 1960s we have had a series of more enlightened policies, which were in line with and which resulted in a more enlightened society.
Even if that has been the case, racism and hate have not gone away. Sometimes it’s the remnants of history that never go away, sometimes its geopolitical issues that cause negative attitudes here. And in recent months we are seeing a new phenomenon that has been there through recent decades but now is more open and perhaps more widespread. We have a public push back to ideas and policies of equality and fairness, a lot more open than before.
It’s not enough to write it off as crazy, right-wing populist, or simplistic. If there is enough of this viewpoint to elect governments which are dedicated to rolling back progress of recent decades, we need to re-think how we address diversity and how we combat racism and hate, how we bring more Canadians back to a sense of fairness, while making the progress we still need to achieve.

So today we want to focus on solutions at two levels:
– Quel sont des démarches que les gouvernements et intervenants non-gouvernementaux peuvent prendre pour éliminer le racisme et la haine.
– Quels sont des Moyens à la disposition des Canadiens et Canadiennes pour lancer le dialogue et promouvoir la compréhension de l’autre, éliminer les préjudices et combattre le racisme.

– What are the things that governments and non-governmental players need to do, and
– How do we create a more constructive and informative dialogue among Canadians.
Todays’ roundtable is designed to push for a national approach to dealing with racism and hate. We wanted to keep it to about 25-30 people, and hence there are many people who are not here – communities, agencies, governments, regions, age, groups, etc. But we have made sure there is a really good and important cross-section of perspectives here. To include all the perspectives, we need to have a larger meeting, and it is certainly worth thinking about.

Before we proceed, I want to thank our co-sponsor, partner – the Canadian Museum of History, esp Mark O’Neill and his staff who have made this all possible.
I also want to thank Unifor, the Union, for supporting the Pearson Centre one more time for today’s session.

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